14
mar
Seneste opdatering: 14/3-10 kl. 2301
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Og vi var bedre end dem (LFPC).

[…] The posters, sized A1 and A3, have been estimated at up to £160 per lot of four.

They were designed by the Ministry of Information during the Second World War to boost morale at home. Many of the slogans have entered into the popular consciousness.

‘We’ve all heard about the ubiquity of Keep Calm and Carry On. But ironically that poster was never actually published. Mainly because its two sister posters – Freedom Is In Peril and Your Courage Will Bring Us Victory were seen as being patronising and condescending.

‘From about 1941 they took a more humorous approach.’ He said wartime propagandists were heavily inspired by commercial advertising. Many of the posters feature attractive women with titles such as Tell Nobody – Not Even Her and Keep Mum – She’s Not So Dumb.

Mr Slocombe said: ‘They had a very contradictory approach to women, and lurched from one stereotype to another depending on the needs of the day.  ‘At the beginning of the War they were shown to be helpless females in need of male protection.

‘Then from 1941 when women were called to do war work, the images became much more positive.  ‘But in the anti-gossip, anti-spying campaigns, women were often portrayed as femme fatales, or as being unreliable, and vaguely untrustworthy.’ […]‘Keep Mum – She’s Not So Dumb’: Treasure trove of 200 WWII propaganda posters go under the hammer

Og Broken Britain i dag: T-shirt med “freedom or death” betegnet “truende”

Tydeligere kan det engang så stolte lands fald næsten ikke illustreres (LFPC).

A father on a family holiday was told to hide his T-shirt because airport security staff claimed the slogan it bore was an incitement to terrorism. Lloyd Berks arrived at Gatwick Airport wearing a trendy white Levi Strauss T-shirt sporting the phrase ‘Freedom or Death’ in turquoise lettering. Beneath the slogan is a picture of a skeleton dressed in armour.

The Gothic imagery is common on the high street and has been used by designers such as Alexander McQueen and artist Damien Hirst. But security officers decided it was ‘threatening’ and told the father of two, who was travelling with his partner and two young children, to turn the T-shirt inside out. […] Football coach told to turn ‘threatening’ Freedom or Death T-shirt inside out by airport security guards

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Donér engangsbeløb?Kan du forpligte dig til fast betaling?

  • Vagn Henning

    Ham med t-shirten mente det åbenvart ikke for alvor. Han valgte trods alt ufriheden…

  • Service i lufthavne er en saga blot. Nu vil alle ansatte hellere spille SS-officerer og kommandere med den gemene hob. De har allerede fået samme status som P-vagter. Blot lidt mere foragtede. Mange af dem kører et magttrip, som de overspiller helt vildt.

    • li

      Det også mit indtryk, personalet virker mere skræmt over uskyldige vittigheder og er selvhøjtidelige politiske korrekte, ja, det skal ikke undre mig, at de er mere bange for en anklage for racisme end fejlagtigt ikke at undersøge muslimerne mere end os andre, det trods alt muslimerne der slæber bomberne med ombord!
      Uha nej, ikke undersøge de højtråbende sarte bombe muslimere mere end os andre, så hellere lade en bombe muslim mere slippe igennem!

  • Peter Buch

    Noget relateret, dog ikke eksakt i ordlyden.
    Fra Wikipedia:
    “Give me Liberty, or give me Death!” is a famous quotation attributed to Patrick Henry from a speech he made in a court hearing on March 23, 1775, at St. John’s Church in Richmond, Virginia, and is credited with having swung the balance in convincing the Virginia House of Burgesses to pass a resolution delivering the Virginia troops to the Revolutionary War. Among the delegates to the convention were future US Presidents Thomas Jefferson and George Washington. Reportedly, those in attendance, upon hearing the speech, shouted, “To arms! To arms!”[1]